ENTERTAINERS

RESTLESS HEART

Restless Heart lead singer Larry Stewart can remember the exact moment and place his life began to change forever.

“I was driving east on I-40 from West Nashville into town to an appointment,” he recalls. “Back then, I was listening to what we were doing in my Jeep Cherokee every day. I had turned the radio on, and ‘Let The Heartache Ride’ was right in the middle of the acapella intro.”

Stewart had been living with the song for a while, and hearing it through his car speakers wasn’t that big of a deal – until he looked at the stereo and saw the numbers 97.9. “It didn’t sink in because I had it in the tape deck for days, then I realized ‘That’s the radio. It’s WSIX.’ I pulled over on the shoulder around White Bridge Road and sat there with my car idling. It was like yesterday.”

‘Yesterday’ has come full circle for Restless Heart. Then one of Nashville’s newest acts, the band is celebrating their 30th Anniversary in 2013, and Dave Innis enjoys the musical ride as much as ever. “I think it’s been an amazing legacy, and it’s been such an honor to have been part of an organization that is still together doing it after thirty years with the same five original guys, and it’s more fun than ever.”

Restless Heart

John Dittrich, Greg Jennings, Paul Gregg, Dave Innis, and Larry Stewart – the men who make up Restless Heart have enjoyed one of the most successful careers in Country Music history, placing over 25 singles on the charts – with six consecutive #1 hits, four of their albums have been certified Gold by the RIAA, and they have won a wide range of awards from many organizations – including the Academy of Country Music’s Top Vocal Group trophy. Those stats aside, Innis feels that their career goes much deeper than that.

“In the past few years, we have really started to branch out in the community, particularly our work with the Nashville Rescue Mission. We have hosted an event called Restless Heart & Friends – Music With A Mission that we do at the Schermerhorn Center with the Nashville Symphony. We invite a lot of our friends in the industry across all genres to join us, and all of the money we raise goes to the Nashville Rescue Mission. The other thing that stands out is the tours we have done in support of the men and women of the Armed Forces. We did some tours with the Air Force, going all over the world.”

Those audiences have sung along with their record-shattering string of hits, such as “I’ll Still Be Loving You,” “Fast Movin’ Train” and “When She Cries.” Stewart says it’s humbling to know Restless Heart has made an impact. “I’m proud of the fact that we get to hear stories from young artists and musicians that we might have made an impression or inspiring them to come to town – having number one records, and hearing the stories of what they meant to people. To know that you have been a part of something that made a difference, the power of music, the power of a song. To be a part of something that made a mark. However big or small of a mark Restless Heart made, it’s still a mark. To be able to appreciate and feel blessed that we got lucky enough to get together. I feel like it was something that was meant to be.”

And, the story is far from over, as Stewart says Restless Heart still has a lot of history to make. “We are still at the top of our game when it comes to singing and playing together. We’ve got some projects we’re working on, and we want to put the Restless Heart brand out to music fans again – to let them know we’re still here and making good music. We’re really looking forward, not trying to rest on our past laurels, we really want to do some new music. We have some fun things we’re considering to celebrate the moment, which we’re trying to put together, and reintroduce ourselves to the world, and take another stab at something.”

Restless Heart – Thirty Years and Those Musical “Wheels” are Still Going Strong!

 

Shenandoah

When country music lovers talk about the greatest groups in the genre, Shenandoah is always at the forefront of any discussion. Fueled by Marty Raybon’s distinctive vocals and the band’s skilled musicianship, Shenandoah became well known for delivering such hits as “Two Dozen Roses,” “Church on Cumberland Road” and “Next to You, Next to Me” as well as such achingly beautiful classics as “I Want to be Loved Like That” and the Grammy winning “Somewhere in the Vicinity of the Heart” duet with Alison Krauss. Shenandoah has recorded ten studio albums (3 certified gold) and placed 26 singles on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart. The boys from Muscle Shoals have left a potent legacy at country radio with over a dozen #1 records.

​Shenandoah made their first public appearance 30 years ago. They are celebrating this milestone with the nationwide “Shenandoah 30th Anniversary Tour.” The group recently signed a record deal with BMG to release their first new album in two decades. Shenandoah premiered their debut single off the album, “Noise,” on SiriusXM and marked their first release to radio in 20 years. The track is produced by Jay DeMarcus of Rascal Flatts and hit the top 30 on the country charts. Their new album, “Reloaded,” was recently released and was the highest debuting album on the Billboard Chart of their entire career. The album debuted in the Top 15 on the iTunes Charts. Last month Shenandoah premiered a brand new music video on CMT for their current single,” That’s Where I Grew Up,” featuring fellow country star, Michael Ray.

Shenandoah

FIREHOUSE

FireHouse has been rockin’ for over a 25 years! Their music has taken them all over the world and has produced Gold, Platinum and Multi-Platinum records in the United States and countries abroad.FireHouse has been rockin’ for over a decade. Their music has taken them all over the world and has produced Gold, Platinum and Multi-Platinum records in the United States and countries abroad.

In 1990, their first album, entitled FireHouse, was released. The band’s first single, Shake & Tumble, had impressive radio success. The band then released Don’t Treat Me Bad, which became their first Top Ten hit. This was followed by Love of a Lifetime, which also entered the Top Ten, reaching the #3 spot on the United States charts. This string of hits vaulted their first album to double platinum status in the United States; also going gold in Canada, Japan and Singapore. At the 1991 American Music Awards, Firehouse found themselves standing before the nation accepting the award for Best New Hard Rock/Metal Band, chosen over Nirvana and Alice in Chains.

FireHouse

The band’s second album, Hold Your Fire, was released in 1992. It produced the hits Reach for the Sky and Sleeping with You. Another Top Ten hit, When I Look into Your Eyes, peaked on the United States charts at #5. This album earned the band two more gold albums and over 1 million sales worldwide.

In 1995, Firehouse released their third album on Epic, simply titled 3. Once again, Firehouse produced another Top Forty hit in the United States with I Live My Life For You. It was with this album that Firehouse made their first trip to Southeast Asia for a promotional tour. Earlier American hits like Don’t Treat Me Bad, Love of a Lifetime and When I Look into Your Eyes had climbed the charts in Asia. Here for You, the second single from 3, had also become a hit. The band then continued their promotional tour in South American countries such as Brazil and Argentina.

Their fourth album, Good Acoustics, was released in 1996 and quickly went gold in Malaysia, Thailand, and Philippines. Good Acoustics contains unplugged versions of the group’s greatest hits, as well as four new songs. This album produced foreign hits such as In Your Perfect World, Love Don’t Care and You Are My Religion. The band returned to Southeast Asia for another promotional tour at the end of 1996. Then, in February 1997, Firehouse embarked on their first concert tour of Southeast Asia playing sold out shows for fans in Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand, and Japan. During May and June they toured the United States before returning to Southeast Asia in July for an unprecedented Twenty-five city sold out tour of Indonesia.

In 1998, Firehouse toured the United States on the Rock Never Stops tour, which also included Slaughter, Warrant, Quiet Riot, and LA Guns. October of 1998 featured the Asian release of Firehouse’s fifth CD, Category 5 on Pony Canyon Records. The album quickly climbed to #4 on the Japanese charts, and supporting promotional tour of Japan followed. Category 5 was officially released in the United States in 1999.

Firehouse continued touring through the winter and spring of 1999, including 3 more sold out shows in Tokyo, Nagoya, and Osaka. On April 22, 1999, the band recorded their live show in Osaka. The result – the first ever live album by Firehouse. Bring ‘em Out Live was released in Japan in December 1999 and in the United States on Spitfire Records in July 2000.

The turn of the century brought the release their seventh album, titled O2. It has been released in SE Asia on Pony Canyon Records, and in the US on Spitfire Records. This album had notable success despite the changing style of popular rock music. During this time, the band decided to part ways with original bass player, Perry Richardson. O2’s remarkable bass playing was supplied by Bruce Waibel. Bruce brought to the band his phenomenal bass playing along with is equally impressive sense of humor. We truly regret to say that in September 2003, Bruce has passed away. He will be greatly missed as a friend and talented musician.

FireHouse headed back into the studio in early 2003 to write and record their 8th album, PRIME TIME. As music changes over time, FireHouse continues to evolve their musical style; yet, at the same time, hang onto their hard rock roots. Released in October of 2003, album number 8 is no exception. You can expect to hear what FireHouse is famous for … soulful, melodic hard rock.

Logan Mize

Trying to get all of Logan Mize’s backstory straight is a little bit like herding cats. But it makes for some great songwriting material.

It involves stories about him living in his Suburban, Justin Timberlake being a fan, his great uncle discovering Buck Owens back in Bakersfield, selling out 2,000-seat venues with no record label behind him, driving a dump truck, wooing his now wife with sushi and a bucket of chicken wings, filming a commercial with Hayden Panettiere, getting a smile and a nod from Merle Haggard during a performance and being named the tourism ambassador by the Governor of the state of Kansas.

All true stories. And there are more where those came from.

FireHouse

There was that show he booked before any of his records came out. He and his band sold out a 600-person capacity club. “We tried out all the songs,” Mize remembers. “They sold out of beer three times that night and they didn’t pay us much of anything because I didn’t even know you had contracts for that sort of thing. That was my crash course in touring and playing clubs. All my old friends, teachers, all the people who laughed at me for going to Nashville — all of a sudden, we held their attention. For three hours. That night I was like ‘this might actually work.’”

But before any of the musical momentum, a young Mize would sing Elton John songs on a karaoke machine in his bedroom, but refused to sing in front of anyone. But after a Kenny Chesney concert in Wichita, the course of this 16-year-old kid’s life was forever changed.

“I have gone through waves of what I want to happen with my career,” Mize says. “Sometimes I forget about the 16-year-old kid who wanted to be Kenny Chesney. But ultimately at the end of the day I am still that kid sitting in the nose-bleed section seeing all the semis parked out front of the arena. I wish I could say I’m just happy to be in the game, but that’s not true. If we aren’t going to shoot for the biggest outcome possible, why do anything?”

That’s precisely why Logan Mize hasn’t let any of the pitfalls that have been sprinkled throughout his musical journey slow him down. And why his new record, Come Back Road, is his best one to date. He has endured bands breaking up. Drummers moving away. Recording projects with big names going unfinished. He’s been homeless, he’s been turned down multiple times up and down Music Row, and he’s come out on top with a project chock full of great songs that is already generating more great stories to add to the story that is his life.

“This record has modern feels to it, but sounds a bit more Midwestern,” he said. “There are a lot of ethereal sounds that represent that open prairie to me. It’s more of a heartland record than a southern record. It’s a record I am super proud of.”

And if the success of the record’s first single, It Ain’t Always Pretty is any indication, this album is poised to be his biggest one yet. After being played on the nationally syndicated morning radio show, The Bobby Bones Show, the song catapulted to #2 on the iTunes chart and has been streamed more than 20 million times on Spotify.
Show host Bobby Bones told his massive audience after playing the song, “That’s a jam, dude! I get chill bumps from that song. That is a Hit. I’ve never even met the guy. I just think it’s the jam. I have handed every record label a hit! If you don’t sign this guy and put him on the radio – I quit!”

Suddenly, all those years of sleeping on people’s floors and driving 6-hour round trips to Nashville to maybe get a chance to play at The Bluebird, seem to begin paying off.

“I knew a fiddle player who had moved to Nashville and he told me if I ever came to town I could stay with him,” Mize remembers. “One day I loaded up my truck and had just enough gas to get to Nashville and $60 left over. I got into town about 3 a.m. and drove to his apartment. His light was on so I pounded on the glass and he let me in. I slept on the floor in his laundry room for a while.”

Before music would pay the bills, Mize worked in excavating, drove a dump truck, mowed grass, drove a party bus, worked security at Coyote Ugly, delivered furniture and weed whacked ditches.

But then one day he started a band that couldn’t keep a rehearsal space because there was no money to pay the rent. Not long after that was the house party at the rental he was living in where someone burned down the barn while he was on a beer run. But during this time, he met a girl named Jill Martin, who would become his wife, he got a publishing deal with Big Yellow Dog, started selling out venues, and in 2016 embarked on a social media-guided acoustic concert trek across the country in his 1989 station wagon he coined “Glenn.” A road trip he says will go down as quite possibly the most fun he’s had in his music career.

“As a 32-year-old with a wife and two kids, the typical thing would be for me to go get a job, but I just want to do my job from a sold-out stadium stage. What I really want to do is entertain people. Make them smile and enjoy themselves.”